Water Producing Wind Turbine

There’s water everywhere on earth, but most is undrinkable or inaccessible. A new kind of wind turbine takes the water in the air and puts it into a form we can imbibe.

Water is everywhere, but there’s hardly a drop to drink. The vast majority of the Earth’s surface is either arid or salty ocean. Only 2.5% of our plant’s water resources are fresh, and just a tiny tiny fraction (0.007%) of that is available for direct human use.

Yet one of the largest sources of water is around us every day: the air. Even our deserts are awash in moist air. Israel’s Negev hits an annual average relative humidity of 64%. That translates into 1.2 centimeters of water for every cubic meter of air.

Israel’s Negev hits an annual average relative humidity of 64%: 1.2 centimeters of water for every cubic meter of air.

The problem, of course, is it rarely is moist enough to rain. Scientists have spent decades exploring ways to convert this water vapor into water for drinking or crops. Such trials include fog nets, as well as solar-powered brine pumps to suck moisture from the air. None have gained widespread adoption.

Now a French company, Eole Water, has successfully tested a wind turbine as a source of fresh water and renewable energy. Field trials in Abu Dhabi are yielding 132 to 211 gallons daily, and the company’s marketing director Thibault Janin says in the magazine Recharge that “the results have been very good.” The results “would be even better, of course, if it was placed in coastal or offshore areas where there is higher humidity and more wind.” More

 

     

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