Monthly Archives: October 2015

Call for Presentation

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Wider Pavilion

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre is hereby accepting expressions of interest to make a presentation at the Caribbean Pavilion at the UNFCCC COP21 being held in Paris, France during the period: Monday 30th November to Friday 11th December 2015.

Peruse the criteria for application here.

The deadline for submission is: 30th October 2015. Late submissions will not be accepted.

The information should be emailed to:

Ms. Ethlyn Valladares
Coordinator for the Wider Caribbean Pavilion Side Events,
Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC),
at hr@caribbeanclimate.bz
,

with the subject heading title: “Expression of Interest to make Presentation at the Wider Caribbean Pavilion at COP21 in Paris.”

Confirmation of acceptance will be provided to you by: 6th November 2015.

Final copies of presentations must be submitted to Ms. Valladares by: 18th November 2015.

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Caribbean reefs affected by mass bleaching

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Staghorn coral (Photo: Renata Ferrarai) Staghorn coral (Photo: Renata Ferrarai)

Reefs in the Caribbean are among the world’s reefs that have been hit by a major episode of bleaching.

Scientists have confirmed that corals in the Caribbean, Atlantic and Pacific are suffering from the worldwide bleaching episode that is said to be the worst on record as the warming Pacific current, El Nino, increases in strength.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) warned it may affect more than 38 per cent of the world’s reefs, and kill over 12,000 sq km of reefs.

Bleaching happens when corals under stress drive out the algae known as zooxanthellae that give them colour.

If normal conditions return, the corals can recover. But the process can take decades, and if the stress continues, the corals can die.

Reefs are under multiple threats including pollution, over-fishing, sedimentation and damage from boats and tourism.

Man-made climate change also contributes…

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Solar Energy for the Kalinago Territory

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The Kalinago Territory, which is home to indigenous kalinagos people of Dominica ,will soon be home to a solar-based energy system. The system is part of a project by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), and is being funded by the European Union to the tune of US $400,000.

Joseph McGann who represents the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre says the centre is supporting national Governments to adapt to the projected climate changes.

“The national Government requested support to provide a renewable energy power source to the Kalinago community,” he revealed. “That involves the [installation] of solar panels to provide energy. In this particular case, we’re providing a 125 kilowatt solar farm to provide energy support to 145 residencies.

“We’re also providing individual stand-alone systems to support 15 houses. These systems will be powered by the panels and batteries to store the energy.”

The 125 kilowatt solar farm will…

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The New and Old in Climate Change

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Students from secondary schools islandwide participating in the second annual Jamaica Rural Economy and Ecosystems Adapting to Climate Change (Ja REEACH) Youth Climate Change Conference at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, on Friday. Students from secondary schools islandwide participating in the second annual Jamaica Rural Economy and Ecosystems Adapting to Climate Change (Ja REEACH) Youth Climate Change Conference at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, on Friday.

Climate change has been going on from the birth of planet Earth. In recent times the pace of climate change has accelerated, with the most deleterious manifestations taking the form of global warming and the concomitant damage of sea level rise.

Small island developing states (SIDS) and low-lying areas of all countries are at risk. The SIDS of the Caribbean are vulnerable to this real existential threat. Their perilous situation is increasingly being acknowledged by the international community as the dangers of climate change have become more widely understood across the world.

Carbon dioxide (CO2), a by-product of fossil-fuel combustion, is a greenhouse gas which traps solar radiation in the atmosphere. Increased human fossil-fuel consumption over…

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Saint Lucia to amplify regional voice on climate justice ahead of COP 21

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The Saint Lucia leg of Caribbean Voices on and for Climate Change was last this week at the Pigeon Island National Landmark.

Caribbean Voice on and for Climate Change is the brain child of Sustainable Development Minister Sen. Hon. Dr James Fletcher. The campaign seeks to bring forward and amplify genuine Caribbean voices, and to build bridges between governments and civil society in our response to the threats caused by climate change. This is increasingly critical for Caribbean countries as many of our communities sit on the shoreline of climate change devastation.

At a regional meeting held in Saint Lucia on 30 – 31 July 2015 media workers, artistes, civil society representatives and climate negotiators acknowledged the severity and urgency of the current and future impacts of climate change on the Caribbean, and they stressed the need to raise awareness of these threats, within and outside the region.

The meeting also…

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Banking On Tourism Amid Climate Change

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Tourists walk along a badly eroding resort-lined beach in Negril.

‘One Billion Tourists, One Billion Opportunities’ was the mantra of the recently concluded Tourism Awareness Week (September 27-October 2). Yet the question remains, is enough being done to ensure that the Caribbean doesn’t lose its tourism product to the effects of climate change?

In 2014, Jamaica attracted 2,080,181 stopover visitors to the island, with the Dominican Republic and Cuba reeling in 5,141,377 and 3,001,958 tourist stopover arrivals, respectively. With the impending losses of prime beaches to rising sea levels and increased climatic temperatures, will we still be able to bank comfortably on the opportunities that we now enjoy in tourism?

It is predicted that the total annual rainfall for CARICOM countries is expected to decrease by an average of 5-10 per cent. This spells trouble for the tourism sector, which is a major consumer of fresh water. Decreased rainfall can…

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Countdown To COP 21: The Caribbean and the New Climate Regime

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Professor Michael Taylor: Thirty to 98 per cent of days annually will be considered ‘hot’ by the 2090s and only two per cent ‘cool’ by the 2080s.

With the emergence of what he calls ‘a new climate regime’, physicist Dr Michael Taylor has painted a picture of a Jamaica and Caribbean region that supports the case for an ambitious deal at the international climate talks set for Paris in December.

“The number of warm days everywhere in the Caribbean is increasing. Over the last 50 years, we have been steadily having more warm days. And we are having more warm nights. This is the kind of new regime we are entering into,” he told a workshop on the Third National Communication and Biennial Update Report to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), held at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge last Tuesday.

Taylor noted that what was also indicative…

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